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Cancer Officially Number One Cause of Childhood Death in U.S.

Cancer Officially Number One Cause of Childhood Death in U.S.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The number one reason blamed for childhood deaths in America used to be accidents; now it’s cancer.

ABC News is reporting today that cancer has officially outranked every other cause of childhood death in this country:
 


Cancer is the leading cause of childhood death in the United States, with 13,500 new diagnoses each year according to the American Cancer Institute. One out of every 300 boys
and one out of every 333 girls will develop cancer before their 20th birthday, according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Cancer in America has seen a sharp increase over the last 100 years across all age groups.Data from the U.S. Public Health Service estimates that cancer death rates in 1900 were around 64 per 100,000; that number has increased almost threefold to 188.7 per 100,000 in 2005.



In fact, the chances of an American being diagnosed with some type of cancer in his or her lifetime is now one in two.

This dramatic increase over a relatively short span of time obviously suggests environmental factors are at play here. So why haven’t all these charitable “run for the cure” cancer drives — fundraisers that happen year after year after year as cancer rates only continue to grow — ever cured anything?

The Cancer Prevention Coalition (CPC) notes that cancer equals big business in this country:


Winning the war on cancer means preventing cancer. Yet cancer is a multi-billion dollar business. Isn’t preventing cancer bad for business? It is for the pharmaceutical and mammography businesses. These industries have intricate ties to U. S. policy makers, directing research funds to ensure their continued profits in cancer diagnosis/treatment.

If prevention is key to crushing cancer, then finding out what is actually causing this cancer epidemic from independent studies not funded by the very companies that stand to profit off pointing fingers in the wrong direction is the first step.

What is causing all this cancer, especially the rise in children? Two big factors may be chemicals and electromagnetic radiation.

A whopping 70-90% of any average U.S. grocery store is filled with processed foods full of chemical additives and preservatives, many of which are genetically modified, in addition to the fact that a vast majority of U.S. food is tainted with pesticides.

The CPC discusses multiple studies that have come to the same conclusion: continual exposure to the multitude ofcarcinogenic pesticides in this country’s food supply is killing our kids:


As documented by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), residues of numerous carcinogenic pesticides are commonly found in most fruits and vegetables. Additionally, milk and other dairy products are often laden with carcinogenic pesticides and antibiotics. Factory farm meat, particularly liver, veal, frankfurters and hamburgers, are also contaminated with carcinogenic pesticides, besides growth-stimulating sex hormones and other feed additives. 
The Bush [Sr.] Administration has flung open the floodgates to carcinogens in our food. With active support of the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has in effect revoked the 1958 Delaney law, which banned intentional contamination of food with any level of carcinogen. 
Instead, the EPA now allows residues of any carcinogenic pesticide in any food at levels posing allegedly “acceptable” or “negligible risk,” as determined by manipulated numbers.

Should pesticide in our food really ever be considered “acceptable”?

Michael Taylor, former Monsanto Vice President for Public Policy and our current Food Safety Czar in this Twilight Zone we all live in, wrote “The De Minimis Interpretation of the Delaney Clause: Legal and Policy Rationale” advocating a change in the interpretation of the 1958 Delaney Clause back in 1988. On it’s face, Delaney literally stated that no carcinogenic agents could be added to processed foods. Taylor’s interpretation paved the way to altering Delaney to be interpreted so that small amounts of known carcinogens could be added to our food, all without regard to the cumulative negative health effects.

Taylor wrote this, by the way, while working at a law firm contracted by Monsanto.

Another potential factor is the continual bathing of our growing children’s brains and bodies in electromagnetic radiation (EMR). Estimates show that those of us living in modern-day America are experiencing 100,000,000 times more electromagnetic frequency (EMF) than our grandparents did simply by existing. Incidents of brain tumors have also been found to be higher in Western, developed nations. Everything from cell phones to cell towers going up everywhere to household appliances to computers…even cars emit EMF. Many of these technologies were never tested for potential harmful effects. Research has found EMF does have an adverse effect on tissues and cells, and this non-ionizing radiation has been classified as a carcinogen or potential carcinogen.

The top two childhood cancers are leukemia and cancers of the brain and nervous system. Studies have linked both EMF exposure and childhood leukemia (for a few examples, see here,herehereand here), and EMF exposure to childhood brain tumors (see herehere and here). Belgium justbanned cell phones specifically designed for children up to age 7 based on this risk.

Armed with this information, recommendations have been suggested for limiting a child’s exposure to pressing cell phones up to their skulls via hands-free devices or even using speakerphone options. WI-FI exposure in the house can be limited by opting to hard wire computers to modems and unplugging computers and modems at night or when not in use.

In a pediatric nursing article “Cell Phones and Children: Follow the Precautionary Road” Suzanne Rosenberg wrote, “While the government has deemed RF radiation to be safe, there is no current significant research to make this claim.” Just like the abundance of chemicals in our food, there is a vested interest in keeping a lid on information regarding just how dangerous this continual radiation exposure could be.

Cancer rates have risen to epidemic levels if estimates now show one in two adults will get cancer sometime in their lifetime. With childhood cancer as the number one child killer, what kind of cancer odds will our children face in their future? Forget racing for the cure; we have to start focusing on the cause.


Childhood Cancer Statistics

 

Each year in the U.S. there are approximately 13,400 children between the ages of birth and 19 years of age who are diagnosed with cancer. About one in 300 boys and one in 333 girls will develop cancer before their 20th birthday. In 1998, about 2500 died of cancer, thus making cancer the most common cause of death by disease for children and adolescents in America.

Statistics on child and adolescent cancer incidence are collected by the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) SEER Program (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results). The data is collected at 10 sites (5 states including CT, UT, NM, IA, and HI and 5 cities including Detroit, Atlanta, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Seattle), with each representing different geographic regions of the United States. The data is then extrapolated to represent national childhood cancer data. The following monograph link summarizes childhood cancer incidence and mortality by disease type, age, ethnicity, and sex. Data collected through SEER has shown that the incidence for some types of childhood cancer have increased slightly since Candlelighters' inception in 1970, but for the most part the rates have been fairly constant in the last several years.

 ACS Childhood and Adolescent Cancer Statistics, 2014

 

 Because Statistics Don’t Tell the Whole Story: A Call for Comprehensive Care for Children With Cancer, by Board member Dr. Jennifer Cullen, PhD, MPH. 

 

An Analysis of the National Cancer Institute's Investment in Pediatric Cancer Research- September 2013

 

Statistics on Childhood Cancer from NCI - "Cancer Incidence and Survival among Children and Adolescents: United States SEER Program 1975-1995".

A Snapshot of Pediatric Cancers- National Cancer Institute

SEER Pediatric Monograph

2012 Cancer Facts and Figures

Childhood Cancer Epidemiology in North America

A Family Disease: The Financial Impact of Childhood Cancer

Incidence Statistics

Childhood cancer rates vary by cancer type. The following graph illustrates the distribution of the more common childhood cancers for children ages birth to 14 years.

Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2003, Div. of Cancer Control and Pop. Sciences, NCI, 2006

Survival Statistics

While the incidence of childhood cancer has changed only slightly since Candlelighters inception in 1970 (an increase from 11.4 per 100,000 population in 1974 to 14.8 per 100,000 in 2004), the overall survival rate for childhood cancer has increased drastically during that time period. Today, the overall 5 year survival rate for childhood cancer is close to 80%. Because treatment cure rates have increased, the population of childhood cancer survivors has also increased. Currently there are estimated to be 270,000 survivors of childhood cancer in the U.S. This equates to one in 640 young adults between the ages of 20 to 39 being a survivor of a childhood malignancy.

Survival however is with a "cost." Two-thirds of those who do survive face at least one chronic health condition. One quarter of survivors face a late-effect from treatment that is classified as severe or life-threatening. Late-effects of treatment can include heart damage, second cancers, lung damage, infertility, cognitive impairment, growth deficits, hearing loss, and more. It is becoming increasingly apparent that childhood cancer "is for life." Late effects from either the disease process or aggressive treatment regimens are given at a time of life when children have growing bodies and developing brains. As such, patterns of late-effects include disabilities, chronic health conditions, and even subsequent battles with additional cancer. It is imperative that all survivors of childhood cancer receive on-going monitoring and continued physical and psychosocial care throughout their adult lives.

Additionally, not all childhood cancers have known such successful survival rates. Sadly many types of childhood cancer continue to have a poor five year prognosis.

Research Funding Statistics

Federal funding for childhood cancer research is predominantly allocated through the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Funds are distributed to Principle Investigators (scientists) working at labs which are often located at Children's hospitals across the country (extramural research); to the Children's Oncology Group to fund clinical trials (extramural research); and to labs within the NCI (intramural research.) Each year, Congress approves the amount of money that the National Institute of Health in Bethesda, Maryland will receive for research initiatives. Cancer will be funded in 2009 at a level of approximately $5.6 Billion. In 2007, the NCI reported that the combined extramural and intramural funding for childhood cancer research was approximately $180 million. However, this estimate could be regarded as liberal as some of the associated research might not be perceived as directly benefiting childhood cancer. Other more conservative estimates, put childhood cancer research funding as low as $30 million annually.

To put this figure in perspective, the NCI allocated $572.4 million on breast cancer research in 2007. Other NIH Institutes funded breast cancer research at a level of $132.6 million in the same year; and the Department of Defense, which also supports breast cancer research, allocated an additional $138 million. As a comparison, breast cancer with its overall 5 year survival rate of close to 90% received $843 million in Federal research funding in 2007. This was in addition to the funds raised by breast cancer organizations through their pink ribbon campaigns and private donations. It is estimated that the success of those initiatives raises approximately $256 million in the combined assets of the top four breast cancer organizations. The success of the pink ribbon campaign and its resulting funding for breast cancer research has resulted in an increase in the five year survival rate of that patient population. Their strength as advocates has resulted in a strong position for both federal and private research funding.

As individuals and organizations supporting our nation's children and adolescents with cancer we too can take a strong stance for our cause with both federal and private research funding. Breast cancer is the sixth most common cause of death by disease of women in America (behind heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, respiratory disease and Alzheimer's). In comparison, cancer is the number one cause of death by disease of America's children. In terms of person years life lost (PYLL), the average age at diagnosis of breast cancer is 61, with a calculated 16 PYLL. In contrast, the average age that a child is diagnosed with cancer is 10. This calculates to 67 PYLL. Sixty seven years of life lost when a child dies from cancer.

Our call to action is to increase the awareness of the incidence and devastation of this disease on America's children. By raising awareness of the fact that childhood cancer remains the number one disease killer of America's children, we can raise the awareness of the need for greater research funding. Like breast cancer, childhood cancer has an international symbol "the gold ribbon. The gold ribbon was created by parents of children with cancer and former CCCF board member Gigi Thorsen. Its first production as a lapel pin was funded by CCCF in 1997. Working together, we too can become successful cancer advocates through the promotion of the gold ribbon for childhood cancer, so that we too can build research funding and much needed cures for America's littlest cancer patients.

 

7 comments:

 
Anonymous said...

Depopulation objective for civilization + EMF radiation + GMO foods = SUCCESS!!

Why change anything if you're successful? If it ain't broke, don't fix it!

William Freeman said...

Silent weapons for quiet wars....google and read it!

Anonymous said...

cannabis oil kicks the ass of cancer, as do many other's like apricot kernels, wheat grass and loads more natural products that can be grown by you. cannabis oil appears to be a general tonic for good health. do your research peeps

Anonymous said...

Cannabis / Hemp:- It is MORE than we have been taught…

It's MORE than REMEDY for Fukushima / DU / 2052 nuclear bombs.
Research Phytoremediation - Cannabis eliminates radiation.

It's MORE than CURE FOR ALL DISease.
Research Rick S

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